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  •  REVIEW: WOOSH

    Lacking "Woosh!" fulfillment

    "Woosh!" — a one-man, 12-character performance by Ryan Egan — is well performed and has some good laughs but the script isn't all there.

    By KRISTINA FELICIANO
    Offoffoff.com

    So-so writing keeps "Woosh" from being wow.

      
    WOOSH
    Written and performed by: Ryan Egan.
     RELATED ARTICLES
    Fringe Festival 2001

    • Overview
    • Show listings

    Theater
    • 21 Dog Years
    • Debbie Does Dallas
    • Doing Justice
    • Einstein's Dreams
    • The Elephant Man: The Musical
    • Equal Protection
    • Fifty Minutes
    • Fuck You or Dead Pee Holes
    • Gene de Tueur
    • L'Hiver Sous la Table
    • Imperative Flight
    • Jim Carroll's The Basketball Diaries
    • Loader #26
    • A Piece of My Heart
    • Sic
    • Snapshot
    • Take
    • Two Girls from Vermont
    • Woosh
    • Zoo

    Dance
    • Absolutely Abreast
    • Break the Floor
    • I Dance

    Art
    • Studio

    Other Fringe Festivals
    • Fringe 2000
    Canadian actor Ryan Egan inhabits 12 personas in 90 minutes, including a lonely gay man who hasn't left his house in "three months, 17 days — today's the 17th"; a crack-addicted teen jonesing for a fix; a motivational speaker; a wannabe B-boy at an audition; a mild-mannered cab driver with a violent dark side; and a Hollywood agent.

    Watching Egan change from character to character is a bit like witnessing an actor's composite shot come to life — look how much range I have!

    His feat might have been more impressive if he'd had a meatier script to work with. There's nothing wrong with the themes he covers: the human face of addiction; the loneliness of the disenfranchised; the susceptibility of the masses. But the way he covers them borders on the cliché. The surprise ending of the segment with the drug-loving teen is that he's really a runaway, which we learn when he calls his dad and, weeping, asks if he can come home.

    There are a few good laughs along the way, though. His portrayal of the spiritually fraudulent talent agent is spot-on in its hollow mirth. This is a guy who beckons a waiter with the line, "Can I have a mo'?" Egan is so obnoxiously convincing here that he inspires ripples of laughter and waves of nausea in equal measure.

    Egan is an earnest performer, and he is engaging despite this show's flaws. Let's hope there's yet another character out there for him, one with a solid scriptwriter behind him.

    AUGUST 24, 2001
    OFFOFFOFF.COM • THE GUIDE TO ALTERNATIVE NEW YORK



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