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    2008-2009 reviews:
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  •  READER COMMENTS

    Reader comments on

    Subject: Re: Mrs. S
    Date: Aug 20, 2002
    Sender: P MortensenPrevious | Next

    At the risk of appearing an even worse human specimen than the maligned critic I feel compelled to point out that it is purely because "people have feelings" that the theatre was born and survived for millenia. It is part and parcel of the "job description" of the artist to inspire the emotions of the audience by their work. If the actor is unable to do this, either for lack of skill or effective material, then the onus must fall on them, for in addition to robbing their audience of their admission fee, they have deprived that audience of time, and the effort that every audience member brings to their part of the "theatrical enterprise." I am tired, both as an audience member and as a creative artist, of the lowering of expectations forced on our art by the urge not to hurt anyone's feelings. When you ask people to spend their money and their time facing one way in a darkened chamber while you "create" you sacrifice the right to "unconditional love and adulation." The "loving hands at home" school of creativity belongs there.
    As regards Mrs. S. - she was a woman who by appearances got knocked up, necessitating athe Tudor equivalent of a shotgun wedding to a much younger man of relatively respectable origins (in an era before DNA tests). She does not seem to have evinced much desire to share her husbands life or his passions. While there can be no doubt of Mr. S' skills as a playwright, he was one of many in a creative environment that we can only envy. The "cult" of Shakespeare, of which we are the inheritors really dates from the 17th Century and the efforts of the early actor/entrepreneurs - particularly D Garrick and the "Shakespeare Jubilee."

    Previous: Re: Mrs. S | Next: Re: Mrs. S

    Respond to this message | Return to original article:



    Response to this comment:
    Mrs. S

    I think your review is extremely ignorant. You should learn to differentiate between a performance of actors as related to the piece they present, and the material itself. Mrs. S is a stately, dignified woman of the most noted and credible playwright who has ever lived, where as Mrs. Behn is a bawdy and brazen woman of influence and worth. Don't you think that knowing that, going to the plays, that they would be of different levels and performance? It's no wonder you are filled with such venom for the actors. How many one woman plays have you written and performed in New York City?

    Even if you don't like a play you should perhaps be a little kinder in your tirades. People have feelings, you know. Or did you lose that on your way to moving to New York to become a famous actrss and you had to settle for being a second rate critic for a web site?

    I am in theatre and I saw the show and enjoyed both for different reasons. It seems that no one writing for your website enjoyed any of the shows they saw. Perhaps they can do better? I say do it then.

    Thank you for your kind attention.
    M. Ivan






    Comment index:

  • Mrs. Shakespeare accurately quotes her husband   from Bard Devotee, Apr 14, 2002
  • All brushed up   from Heather Grayson, Apr 15, 2002
  • question   from , Apr 15, 2002
  • Mrs. S   from M. Ivan, Apr 15, 2002
  • Re: Mrs. S   from Heather Grayson, Apr 15, 2002
  • Re: Mrs. S   from frank episale, Apr 21, 2002
  • » Re: Mrs. S «   from P Mortensen, Aug 20, 2002
  • Re: Mrs. S   from Dawn Harris, Jan 20, 2004
  • Mrs. Shakespeare accurately quotes her husband   from Bard Devotee, Apr 14, 2002
  • All brushed up   from Heather Grayson, Apr 15, 2002
  • question   from , Apr 15, 2002
  • Mrs. S   from M. Ivan, Apr 15, 2002
  • Re: Mrs. S   from Heather Grayson, Apr 15, 2002
  • Re: Mrs. S   from frank episale, Apr 21, 2002
  • » Re: Mrs. S «   from P Mortensen, Aug 20, 2002
  • Re: Mrs. S   from Dawn Harris, Jan 20, 2004